Technology

Russian sanctions reveal how much more automation needs to be in the supply chain

Images of container ships unable to offload goods at ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach late last year were symbolic of the problems plaguing the supply chain in the wake of the pandemic. Not enough longshoreman, along with a shortage of truck drivers, meant products couldn’t get from ports to warehouses and then find their way to retailers and consumers. Supply chains had scarcely recovered before the recent sanctions slapped on Russia set this globally interconnected network back in a huge way. Now, with China’s zero-Covid restrictions resulting in lockdowns and curbs in the largest port hubs, industry experts say the disruptions to the supply chain could be felt for another year, making the deployment of automation and AI-driven solutions even more critical. Oil and gas prices have skyrocketed since Russia began sending troops into Ukraine late last month. The national average price for a gallon of regular gas is now $4.33; a year ago it was $2.83.

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OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

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