RealNews

Air of Anxiety in Moscow After Blast on Subway

The Moscow Metro was packed once again on Monday, the first workday after an explosion on a subway car took at least 40 lives on Friday in what officials now say was a suicide bombing. But the atmosphere was not business as usual, as flags around the city flew at half-staff, a pile of red carnations sat on a subway platform near the site of the blast and officials warned of more attacks to come. The first of the dead were buried Monday as more than 100 people remained hospitalized, including more than 20 reported to be in critical condition. Three days after the explosion, President Vladimir V. Putin had made no further comment after oblique remarks on Friday. He said then that although there was no evidence, he was certain that Chechen separatists were involved. Full Story

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