RealNews

Welcome to yet another year of viruses

It’s sad, but true. We’ll see plenty of e-mail viruses in 2004, despite expectations that these pests would disappear in 2003. Here’s why viruses won’t go away–and how to protect yourself. When the MiMail.l e-mail virus appeared last month, it got little attention from the media. After all, it was only a minor variant of the MiMail family, and spread slowly across the Internet, right? Well, it may not have been the most destructive worm ever, but it turns out that MiMail virtually shut down The Spamhaus Project and SpamCop, two sites where you can report spam abuses. 2003 was supposed to be the year to end e-mail-borne viruses, given that both MS Outlook and antivirus apps have become much better at stopping them. But in 2004, I expect to see more of these pests, especially more spam-related ones like MiMail.l, as professional spammers continue using them both to collect e-mail addresses and to distribute their messages anonymously. MiMail.l wasn’t the first worm involved with junk e-mail. As early as January 2003, antivirus experts noticed a worm called Sobig was aiding the sending of spam. By early summer of 2003, there was evidence that Sobig was building a network of what are called open proxies, systems that act as blind intermediary portals to the Internet. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.