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British anti-terrorism law attacked as perversion of justice

Human rights group Amnesty International attacked British emergency internment laws, introduced in the wake of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States, as a “perversion of justice”. “This legislation has created a Guantanamo Bay in our own backyard,” Kate Allen, Amnesty’s director for Britain, told the Independent newspaper, referring to the US military base in Cuba. In a hard-hitting report, Amnesty said that the emergency legislation adopted by Britain had created a “shadow” criminal justice system for foreigners suspected of being “terrorists”. By allowing foreign nationals to be locked up indefinitely without charge or trial, the government had failed to meet international standards, Amnesty claimed. Its report, entitled “UK: Justice Perverted under the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001”, examined the laws that have led to 14 people being detained at high-security prisons. Six of the terrorist suspects will have been in detention for two years on December 19, said Amnesty. Full Story

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