RealNews

An insurgency isn't easily cracked

Since May 1, when President Bush declared major combat operations over in Iraq, 87 U.S. troops have been killed in action and 720 troops wounded. Internal military reports show that the average number of attacks on coalition forces has increased to 17 a day from just a few a day after Baghdad fell in early April. Are the attacks the last gasp of diehard supporters of Saddam Hussein? Or are U.S. commanders misreading the enemy? Coalition officials say the ambushes are strategically insignificant and will peter out as the coalition succeeds in rebuilding Iraq, though they concede that may take a long time. American strategists have compared the Iraqi resistance to the Werewolves, a group of former German SS officers after World War II who tried unsuccessfully to wage an underground war against occupation forces. The movement was doomed from the start and achieved almost nothing because the SS officers lacked public support and had few followers. Only one death, that of the German mayor of Aachen, was attributed to Werewolves. Full Story

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