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Mosaic Browser Marks 10th Anniversary

Ten years ago this month, software developers at the University of Illinois released Mosaic, which used graphical images and simplicity to open the World Wide Web to the masses. What had been a domain of scientists and computer geeks dominated by cumbersome language and technical complexity became simple enough for nearly anyone to use. Mosaic was released in April 1993 by the school’s National Center for Supercomputing Applications as free software. It became the foundation for today’s Web browsers, such as Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Netscape Communications’ Communicator. Mosaic’s lead developer, Marc Andreessen, became one of Netscape’s founders and took some of his UI colleagues with him. “It was an accelerator for the whole Internet,” said Larry Smarr, the former director of the computing center. “It sort of took the Internet to the next level of capability.” Before Mosaic, access to the Internet and the World Wide Web was limited to text. The new software brought a way to integrate images and sound with words. Full Story

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