RealNews

Army relying on new battlefield network technology

It is wartime, and for the first time ever U.S. military commanders and soldiers no longer have to yell coordinates over the radio and then plot maps to pinpoint their exact locations. Instead, the Army fighting in Iraq is equipped with computer-driven networks on the battlefield that automatically show their locations at any time. The technology, referred to as FBCB2 by the military, is a mobile system of networked computers, radios, satellites, transponders and powerful software. It was developed over several years by TRW, which is now Northrop Grumman Mission Systems in Reston, Va. But its completion was accelerated over the past six months, and 1,000 platforms have been fielded on three continents to the U.S. Army and Marines and to British forces, according to Thomas Plavcan, deputy project manager for FBCB2 at Fort Monmouth, N.J. Full Story

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