RealNews

Bush eases sanctions on Libya trade

Citing Libya’s efforts to abandon its pursuit of weapons of mass destruction, President Bush on Monday lifted most U.S. trade sanctions against the northern African nation, clearing the way for $1.3 billion to be paid to the families of those killed when a bomb brought down Pam Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988. The president’s move also opens the way for direct air service between Libya and the United States and the possible American importation of Libyan oil. The White House described Bush’s actions as “another milestone” in his post-Sept. 11, 2001, drive to combat the proliferation of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. Even as the two nations pursue a path toward normal diplomatic relations, however, U.S. officials noted Monday that Libya remains, in the eyes of the American government, a “state sponsor of terrorism.” That official designation forbids U.S. businesses from exporting to the North African country any equipment with potential military applications. Full Story

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