RealNews

Bioterrorism Act causes headaches for exporters

The chocolate bunnies look pretty benign, all boxed up for sale at the company store. But under new U.S. rules, no bonbon is above suspicion as a possible terrorist tool, not even the tamest of sweets at Mexico City’s Turin Chocolates factory. So for several months, export coordinator Angelica Rochín has carefully registered every confection her factory makes, from tequila-filled candies to chocolate-covered raisins, in a new U.S. database aimed at protecting America’s food supply from a mass poisoning by terrorists. To comply with the new rules under the 2002 Bioterrorism Act, companies also have to submit information about their factories, workforce and location, and send a detailed report about the contents of every shipment at least two hours before it reaches the border. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

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