RealNews

Animal database to help detect terrorism

Pets and farm animals may be key in detecting bioterrorism, and Purdue researchers are creating the processes to do so. A data surveillance system being developed by the School of Veterinary Medicine accesses a database of records from 325 Banfield Pet Hospitals in 40 states. The computerized records allow researchers to more quickly track the patterns of animal diseases, said Larry Glickman, professor of epidemiology. If there is an increase in specific diseases, parasites or even in non-specific signs such as respiratory or gastrointestinal problems, the system can determine if there’s anything unusual. The centers are located in all major population centers where one might be concerned about new infectious agents by terrorists, said Glickman. Full Story

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