RealNews

U.S. Cities Say They're Short-Changed in War on Terror

Almost three years after the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington, many American cities complain that federal money to train and equip police, fire and other emergency workers is still merely trickling through to those who need it most. The biggest U.S. cities say they are being short-changed in the fight against terrorism by red tape and flaws in the system for handing out federal funds to prepare for future attacks. “The mechanism for getting funds down to cities and towns is not working as well as it should,” said Michael Reinemer, spokesman for the National League of Cities. “In some places there have been some serious logjams.” Worse still, major centers like Los Angeles, New York and Washington complain they are losing out because of a system that failed to make sure money would be directed to the most vulnerable places. Full Story

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