RealNews

Intelligence Reform Will Not Be Quick

The White House, Congress and two independent commissions are discussing wholesale reform of the nation’s intelligence community in the wake of its failures to detect the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and accurately describe Iraq’s weapons programs, mistakes that were highlighted in recent public hearings. But despite warnings from some members of the national commission investigating the terrorist attacks that they will soon recommend intelligence reform, many government officials say it will be at least a year until any substantive change is realized. None of the panels has completed its work, and any recommendations for substantial change will be politically controversial, particularly if they involve control of the Pentagon’s intelligence programs, which account for the vast majority of U.S. intelligence spending. The large number of agencies and congressional committees with vested interests in the current intelligence structure guarantees that change will be difficult, as past commissions recommending reforms can attest. Full Story

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