RealNews

U.S. Airlines Balk at Paying More for Security

The U.S. airline industry says its slow recovery from a financial tailspin in the wake of the 2001 hijack attacks is at risk because the Bush administration wants carriers to come up with an additional $400 million for security measures. “The health of the industry remains fragile,” Jim May, chief executive of the Air Transport Association, told reporters at a news conference. May, whose group is the chief lobbying organization for the industry, said domestic airlines are projected to lose between $2 billion and $3 billion in 2004. The projected red ink is substantially less than the previous three years when the Sept. 11, 2001, hijack attacks and their aftereffects threw an already weakened industry into its worst-ever financial crisis. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.