RealNews

U.S. to Keep Key Data On Infrastructure Secret

Firms Encouraged to Report Security Gaps. Starting tomorrow, chemical companies, railroads, electric utilities and other parts of the nation’s critical infrastructure can begin submitting sensitive information to the Department of Homeland Security about their vulnerabilities to terrorist attacks with assurances that their proprietary data would be safe from public disclosure. Under the Homeland Security Act of 2002, the department can deem data voluntarily provided by businesses that help the government stave off possible disruptions by terrorists as secret and unavailable to outsiders. The law’s supporters view it as a way for U.S. officials to help map security plans for critical U.S. infrastructure, 85 percent of which is in private hands. But some advocates for environmental protection and open-records laws say unscrupulous firms might manipulate the rules as part of an attempt to evade federal enforcement of health or safety rules. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.