RealNews

Evidence mounts for use of e-discovery in legal system

But the process is raising some concerns. As more and more business documents are put into electronic form, ”e-discovery” will play a growing role in court cases. And the process of seeking evidence in electronic data — known as electronic discovery — is raising concerns across the legal system, including its effect on the cost of litigation, privacy issues and the implications of fast-changing technology. Discovery is the process of identifying documents that may be relevant to litigation and making them available to an adversary in a lawsuit. E-discovery applies that process to electronic documents, including e-mail, word-processed files, data bases and spreadsheets. The role of e-mail messages in high-profile American lawsuits such as the U.S. Justice Department’s antitrust case against Microsoft Corp. has helped draw attention to the issue. Yet many Canadian lawyers have been uncomfortable with e-discovery until recently, says Peter Vakof, vice-president of forensic technology solutions at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP Canada in Toronto. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.