RealNews

Hacking the Call Center

A few regulated industries, such as financial services and medicine, already have clamped down on call center security, largely because companies in these markets face stiff penalties if they do not adequately protect customer data. Every corporate IT department faces its share of security threats from the outside world. But contact centers face double the danger, since potential data thieves likely lurk in their own ranks as well. After all, when you combine an employment revolving door with easy access to sensitive customer information, including social security numbers, credit card numbers and financial information, you have a potentially explosive situation. And contact centers are notorious for their low pay and high turnover rates. Despite these risks, some experts say the contact-center industry has been slow to beef up its security standards. The push to reduce costs-per-call has reigned supreme, they argue, leaving little budget for IT enhancements. A recent dramatic increase in identity theft might lead to major changes, however. California has become the first state to penalize companies whose sensitive customer data is compromised, and more legislation has been proposed at the state and national levels. This trend may culminate in new security standards — and higher costs — for both internal and contract contact centers. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.