RealNews

Air-traveler screening, privacy concerns collide

The government may launch a trial run this month of a new computerized system that uses financial records of air travelers to identify passengers who might pose security risks. But many in the airline industry remain reluctant to help the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) move forward with the project. They continue to balk at sharing passenger information with the government a necessary step before the system can be put into place. Government officials say the updated Computer Assisted Passenger Prescreening System, dubbed CAPPS II, is designed to provide quick background checks of the 1.8 million people who fly each day. But critics of the system, already two years in development, say the system could threaten the privacy of passengers. TSA officials remain optimistic that airlines eventually will provide information about fliers. But until the agency and the airlines agree about precisely how that information will be used, TSA cannot move forward with an $80 million program that officials consider a cornerstone of aviation security. Full Story

OODA Analyst

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