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Digital Doomsday

Not long ago, cyber-terrorists were Public Enemy Number One. In the summer of 2000, a malicious, reclusive hacker released a computer virus called “I Love You” that raced around the globe, destroying $10 billion worth of data. Spies worldwide scrambled to hunt him down, and newspapers ran horrified above-the-fold coverage. Cyberspace seemed like the scariest place on Earth. Then two planes flew into the World Trade Center — and the real, physical world became instantly scarier. Explosions, destroyed buildings — that’s the stuff that scares the pants off America. So ever since Sept. 11, it’s been hard to get worked up about hackers, viruses and digital mayhem. It all seems like a narcissistic indulgence of the dot-com era, when the Internet was the biggest thing going. When a Manhattan friend recently saw me reading a copy of Black Ice, he scoffed: “That stuff is crap. They’re not gonna attack us on the ‘Net. They’re going to set off car bombs in Times Square. They want dead bodies.” This, in a nutshell, is what the book’s author, Dan Verton, is up against. Because he argues that terrorists are indeed developing a new generation of cyberattacks — and they’ll be far worse than anything we could imagine, precisely because we aren’t guarding against them. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.