RealNews

ISPs: Feds should pay for Internet surveillance

Canadian Internet service providers say they shouldn’t have to pay for the costs to conduct criminal surveillance on behalf of police under potential changes to the Lawful Access law. The Department of Justice late last week released the results of a consultation that began last year after it issued a proposal for legislation that would require ISPs to keep all traffic logs for six months, while allowing authorities to more closely monitor suspected criminals. It also raised the notion of a national database of every Canadian with an Internet account. The more than 300 responses to the consultation process included submissions from major telecommunications providers like BCE and Telus, public interest advocacy groups like Electronic Frontier Canada as well as industry associations representing ISPs. In a chapter which summarizes the service providers’ views, industry advocates maintain that the government should pick up the tab for any “basic intercept capability” that law enforcement officials would require. Full Story

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