RealNews

Hill's 9/11 Probe Finds Multiple Failures

In the months leading up to Sept. 11, 2001, the al Qaeda hijackers were not living isolated lives in the United States, as authorities have asserted. Instead, conspirators were in contact with as many as 14 people who had turned up in previous FBI counterterrorism investigations — at least four of whom were under active FBI investigation — according to a partially declassified investigation by the joint Congressional Committee on Intelligence released yesterday. The U.S. intelligence community “failed to fully capitalize” on information that might have allowed agents to unravel the hijack plot, the joint committee concluded, and bungled clues that should have led the FBI to two or more of the terrorists before they could act. The joint committee’s report represents the fullest examination so far of the U.S. response to the growing threat from the violent Islamic fundamentalists gathered under the al Qaeda umbrella of multimillionaire Osama bin Laden. Based on an examination of more than 500,000 documents and testimony at nine public hearings and 13 closed sessions last year, the report paints a picture of a poorly organized, understaffed and sometimes half-hearted effort, in agencies across the government, that missed the warning signs and failed to add up the clues. Full Story

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