RealNews

Cybercrime investigators plead for extensive powers

Law enforcement agencies want more powers in cybercrime investigations so that “any person”, even though not a criminal suspect in a case, can be forced to provide critical information. In a submission to a parliamentary cybercrime inquiry, the Australian Crime Commission (ACC) urges law enforcement agencies to make greater use of its “extraordinary powers” to summons not only suspects but anyone who holds information considered critical in an investigation. The coercive powers could be extended to IT managers or anyone who holds information such as an encryption key or password. Under the ACC powers a person loses their “right to silence” and is forced to engage in an interview or face severe penalties ranging from imprisonment and fines of up to $20,000. Consultant and lecturer at the University of Technology’s Faculty of Law, Ajoy Ghosh, said the person does not need to be a suspect, or the owner of the computer or an employee of the owner of the computer. Full Story

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