RealNews

A Push From Homeland Security

ROBERT LISCOUSKI left his job as the head of information security at Coca-Cola three months ago to join a start-up. “I refer to it as DHS.com, and that’s probably a good way to think about it,” he said. The pace of work is frenetic, the organization is being built from the ground up, and, like a dot-com in the euphoria years, the new Department of Homeland Security — the DHS in Mr. Liscouski’s locution — will have some serious money to spend. Mr. Liscouski, an assistant secretary at the department, who spoke at a conference last Wednesday, hit a nerve with his analogy. The computer executives at the gathering in Washington were suitably amused, nodding and smiling — wistfully no doubt. Nothing, of course, will bring back the dot-com heyday. But to much of Silicon Valley, the government’s mandate to improve homeland security looks as if it could be the next-best thing — a technology push, stimulated by government, that is expected to create a lucrative market in computer hardware and software for surveillance, data collection, data analysis and cybersecurity. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.