RealNews

Raid in Georgia triggers 'dirty bomb' fears

In a sign that the clandestine market in nuclear materials is thriving despite the war on terrorism, police in the former Soviet republic of Georgia seized two metal containers filled with radioactive material that could be used to make a so-called dirty bomb, Georgian authorities said Monday. The containers, which held cesium-137 and strontium-90, were discovered during a raid near the country’s capital, Tbilisi, on May 31, Russia’s Ria- Novosti news agency reported. Police also found a glass capsule containing Yprite, or mustard gas, Reuters reported. A chemical used in World War I, mustard gas causes blindness, blistering of the skin and lungs and, often, painful and slow death. The deadly substances were found in boxes with writing in Russian and English in the back of a taxi headed for Tbilisi’s central train station, Ria- Novosti reported. The taxi driver, who told investigators he was unaware of his dangerous cargo, said he was supposed to turn over the boxes to two men at the train station. Full Story

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