RealNews

Port Knocking

An introduction to how trusted users can manipulate firewall rules to transmit information across closed ports. Firewall administrators are challenged to balance flexibility and security when designing a comprehensive rule set. A firewall should provide protection against malfeasants, while allowing trusted users to connect. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to filter out the bad guys, because filtering on the basis of IP addresses and ports does not distinguish connecting users. Bad guys can and do come from trusted IP addresses. Open ports remain a necessary vulnerability: they allow connections to applications but also may turn into open doors for attack. This article presents a new security system, termed port knocking, in which trusted users manipulate firewall rules by transmitting information across closed ports. Briefly, users make connection attempts to sequences of closed ports. The failed connections are logged by the server-side packet filtering firewall and detected by a dæmon that monitors the firewall log file. When a properly formatted knock sequence, playing the role of the secret used in the authentication, is received, firewall rules are manipulated based on the information content of the sequence. This user-based authentication system is both robust, being mediated by the kernel firewall, and stealthy–it’s not possible to detect whether a networked machine is listening for port knocks. Port knocking does not require any open ports, and it can be extended to transmit any type of information encoded in a port sequence. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.