RealNews

Mayors want security money sent straight to cities, not statehouses

Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the nation’s mayors have often seemed close to open revolt over what they call inadequate financial support from the federal government, especially for expanded homeland security. They’re still steamed at Washington, but much of their ire now is directed at governors. The mayors say federal money for training, equipment and stepped-up patrols should go directly to cities, which would respond first to a terrorist attack. The money now goes first to governors for distribution — a process many mayors say allows decisions to be made on the basis of state politics instead of need. ”Our cities need help now,” said Mayor James Garner of Hempstead, N.Y., a Republican and president-elect of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, which meets here through Tuesday. ”We are Democratic and Republican mayors alike. We speak with one voice. That voice says send the money directly to the cities, not to statehouses.” About 200 U.S. mayors are here for their annual meeting. The underlying theme of the session is frustration with the federal and state governments. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.