RealNews

Open Season on Wireless LANs

When individuals access a public WLAN at a coffee shop across the street from a library, for example, the laptop is configured to connect to the nearest, or strongest signal. The user cannot tell if that network is located in the coffee shop or the library. Wi-Fi-based wireless local area networks are spreading like wildfire among homeowners, businesses small and large, and such public entities as libraries and government offices. But most users pay little attention to security, inviting penetration of their networks by anyone within range (about 300 feet) of an unprotected access point. And such intrusions occur all too often. In fact, “war driving” is becoming an increasingly popular practice among mobile computer geeks. War drivers cruise the streets with laptops rigged for WLAN broadband connectivity searching for open access points. Typically, they mark a new find with graffiti that flags the spot for other Wi-Fi users. All most of these war drivers are interested in is getting free Internet use. However, leaky WLANs also give network intruders with more nefarious motives easy entry. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.