RealNews

Spread of buggy software raises new questions

When his dishwasher acts up and won’t stop beeping, Jeff Seigle turns it off and then on, just as he does when his computer crashes. Same with the exercise machines at his gym and his CD player. “Now I think of resetting appliances, not just computers,” says Seigle, a software developer in Vienna, Virginia. Malfunctions caused by bizarre and frustrating glitches are becoming harder and harder to escape now that software controls everything from stoves to cell phones, trains, cars and power plants. Yet computer code could be a lot more reliable — if only the industry were more willing to make it so, experts say. And many believe it would help if software makers were held accountable for sloppy programming. Full Story

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