RealNews

New mystery in terrorism trial: Who drew sketches?

The ghost of Ali Mohammed Ahmed haunted the Detroit terrorism trial Tuesday as prosecutors and defense lawyers questioned the brother of the dead Yemeni immigrant, who may have diagrammed potential terrorism targets in a day planner. Naser Ahmed, 27, of Dearborn testified that his brother, Ali Ahmed, 22, was a mentally ill chain smoker who was incapable of working and who spent most of his waking hours trying to bum cigarettes from anyone who would provide them. “He’d do anything to get cigarettes,” Naser Ahmed testified through an interpreter on the third day of trial testimony. Naser Ahmed said his brother grew up in a small village in Yemen and came to the United States in 1999. Because of worsening psychiatric problems — he had schizophrenia — Ali Ahmed was admitted repeatedly to Detroit-area hospitals before jumping to his death from an I-94 overpass in Dearborn on March 2, 2001. Federal prosecutors called Naser Ahmed to bolster their argument that four terrorism suspects induced Ali Ahmed — possibly with cigarettes — into signing his name in the day planner to conceal who owned it. They say the plannercontains sketches of an American air base in Turkey and a military hospital in Jordan. Full Story

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