RealNews

Washington struggles with privacy versus security

At two conferences on technology and homeland security here Thursday, controversy arose over whether technological measures designed to protect the U.S. from terrorism should proceed unhindered or if such things as data-mining programs must be halted until there are protections to civil liberties in place. Responding to a question about how to ensure technology is not misused to violate privacy, Paul Rosenzweig, a senior legal research follow at conservative think-tank Heritage Foundation, said Thursday that putting the brakes on technologies like the proposed Total Information Awareness (TIA) program in the U.S. Department of Defense is not the answer. [See “Anti-data mining amendment moves forward,” Feb. 13.] “I think the answer … is not prohibition, but you folks out here: extensive oversight, use of the mechanisms of Congress and the courts to restrain the misuses of power,” Rosenzweig said to a room full of congressional staffers at an Congressional Internet Caucus luncheon on security against terrorism and privacy. Full Story

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