RealNews

U.S. Sees First Cases of Smallpox Shot Reactions

Three people vaccinated against smallpox as part of U.S. preparations for a possible biological attack developed symptoms that could be an adverse reaction to the shots, health officials said on Thursday. None of the cases is life-threatening and two of them appear to be associated with other conditions, but health officials are scrutinizing any reactions from the program, which has run into considerable public resistance. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said a 39-year-old woman, a nurse, developed a general rash that could be generalized vaccinia — a skin infection caused by the vaccine — and said a 60-year-old man developed chest pain. Both lived in Florida, the CDC said. The rash is a well-known side effect of the vaccine, while chest pain, or angina, is not, the CDC said. The chest pain patient had a history of high blood pressure, which can lead to heart disease. In addition, Florida health officials reported a third possible case. “The third individual appears to have suffered acute gallbladder inflammation resulting in removal of the gallbladder,” the Florida Department of Health said. Gallbladder troubles are not known to be a side-effect of smallpox shots. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.