RealNews

White House Takes a Pass on Securing Cyberspace

The White House has missed an opportunity to play a lead role in making the Internet safer from cyber attacks. The nation’s first cybersecurity strategy, released this month, is a watered down version of earlier drafts and relies almost exclusively on voluntary measures and good will. There’s nothing wrong with encouraging companies and individuals to practice safe computing. But on its own, the new White House approach won’t do much to improve security on the Internet. Securing cyberspace is an incredibly complex task. As with physical facilities — banks, airports, power plants — effective security in cyberspace requires a combination of good protection, good detection and swift response. But unlike other infrastructure, cyberspace is a medium that is rapidly evolving. Further, its facilities aren’t owned by any one organization: it is a loosely bound conglomerate of millions of individual computers and public and private networks owned by entities that span the entire globe. Citing that complexity, the mandate-averse tech industry was able to plead successfully with the government to keep its distance. Full Story

OODA Analyst

OODA Analyst

OODA is comprised of a unique team of international experts capable of providing advanced intelligence and analysis, strategy and planning support, risk and threat management, training, decision support, crisis response, and security services to global corporations and governments.