ArchiveOODA Original

Cybercriminals as the Russian State’s Deniable Proxies

Putin’s Russia has demonstrated a penchant for relying on proxies to provide a degree of deniability while pursuing its military objectives. As noted in Christoph Zürcher’s book The post-Soviet wars: Rebellion, ethnic conflict and nationhood in the Caucasus, Putin’s popularity emerged in large part due to his successful resolution of the conflict with Chechnya, which he achieved by co-opting the Kadyrov warlords. More recently, Putin has relied on not only deniable Russian forces, but also proxies within Ukraine. Still, blunders by Russian private military companies like the Wagner Group and Slavonic Corps in Syria have demonstrated how this deniability can backfire.

Want more insight?

This content is restricted to OODA Network members only. Members get access to all site content plus access to exclusive reports and events. Please consider becoming a member. For more information please click here. Thanks!

Already a member?  Sign in to your account.

Tyler Robinson

Tyler Robinson

Tyler Robinson is an OODA analyst currently based in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He holds an undergraduate degree in International Relations and a Master of Letters in International Security Studies from the University of St Andrews. His research interests include political psychology, deniable actors, gray area phenomena, and privatized security.